How to Forecast Weather in Wilderness | Survival Skills

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One of the things that’s a big concern, or a big factor, that’s going to influence how you do things when you’re out in the wilderness is what sort of weather you’re having. People like to know in advance what the weather’s going to be like. Oftentimes, that means pulling out your iPhone and looking at it. Sometimes, the weather’s different than it says on your phone. I have people out, and I’ll let them know that the phone’s for making phone calls, and holding out your hand is how you find out what the weather’s doing.

If you would like to know what the weather is going to do, there are certain signs that you can look for in the environment. Right now, we have a beautiful, blue-sky day. We also have a lot of wind. Wind means that there’s temperature change somewhere. Wind occurs when there’s a temperature change going on. So wind is a big indicator of weather change.

If you’re in a mountain environment, some of the things you can look for are cloud patterns. And unfortunately, we don’t have any clouds today to demonstrate this, but when you see long, thin, wispy clouds, or sort of a white pass with clouds streaking off of it that almost look like contrails from an airplane, those are called mare’s tails. And mare’s tails indicate that you’re at the edge of a front, because there’s a lot of high-altitude wind trading place. That’s a real indicator that the weather’s going to change relatively soon. Probably in the next 24, 36 hours, you may get a different type of weather than you’re experiencing.

Another thing to be aware of is the local weather patterns. Local weather patterns happen in micro-climates. So there might be an area that gets a thunderstorm every day at 3:00 p.m. A lot of places in Florida, you can count on it raining every afternoon and then stopping within 45 minutes. So be aware of local weather patterns when you’re out.

If you’re down low in the trees, there are some indicators that you can use that’ll kind of give you an idea of what the pressure’s doing. High pressure and low pressure definitely are going to be affecting your weather. High pressure is going to be nice, sunny, clear weather. Low pressure is going to be possibly warmer, but more wetter weather. One of the ways that you can tell that is, if you’re building a campfire at night and you’re looking at your fire, if the smoke is rising straight up, it’s an indicator that you have high pressure in the area. If your smoke is staying close to the ground, sort of spreading out, it’s an indication that you have a lower pressure in the area.

One of the other indicators that you have low pressure, or you’re about to get rain, is the insect activity. If you’re out and it’s a day like today and there’s no bugs, nothing’s bothering you, everything’s happy, then chances are, it’s not going to rain, and you’re going to be nice and dry and continue to be happy. If you’re being pestered really bad by mosquitoes, by blackflies, and by gnats, and they’re really swarming, the flying insects, the biting insects, will get especially active just before a change in the weather, before it rains. They’re going to get a last meal in before it starts raining on them.

Those are some tips that’ll help you predict the weather for camping, for travelling in the outdoors. One of the old sayings that is usually pretty accurate is, “Red sky at night, camper’s delight. Red sky in morning, campers take warning.” So I think originally it was sailors, but it works for campers too.

Categories: Survival Skill

Comments

  1. All Business
    All Business 21 July, 2016, 19:32

    Has anyone fact checked this guy? Wind is a result of pressure differences not temperature. The rising of smoke is suppressed with high pressure because of a subsidence inversion in most cases. High pressures cause air stagnation and higher pollen content because there is no mixing in the atmosphere. With low pressure, smoke would rise higher because the atmosphere is mixing. Sorry, but this guy is not credible. Not everything he is saying is wrong, but its hard to figure out what info is full of it and what is reliable.

    Reply this comment
  2. greymajickjedi
    greymajickjedi 21 July, 2016, 19:32

    One of THE BEST OUTDOOR VIDEOS I'VE EVER SEEN!!! 😀 i've been searching for techniques and knowledge like this FOR YEARS and i hope to see much more!!! Would give a hundred thumbs up if if could.
    I was also amazed with how concise it was. Many outdoors videos drag on and on over explaining everything like the viewers have learning disabilities. Keep up the great work and KEEP EDUCATING THE FREE REPUBLIC!

    Reply this comment
  3. Chris Fish
    Chris Fish 21 July, 2016, 19:32

    whoa that profile pic must be popular!

    Reply this comment
  4. RowmanSailor
    RowmanSailor 21 July, 2016, 19:32

    'Sailors' and 'campers' made this video!

    Reply this comment
  5. Eren Jaeger
    Eren Jaeger 21 July, 2016, 19:32

    Well at least this is useful

    Reply this comment
  6. Plague Doc
    Plague Doc 21 July, 2016, 19:32

    Couldnt stop laughing at the shirt.

    Reply this comment
  7. Tristan Geutjes
    Tristan Geutjes 21 July, 2016, 19:32

    First douchebag?

    Reply this comment
  8. Herp Derpson
    Herp Derpson 21 July, 2016, 19:32

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